Advanced Interventional
Spine & Orthopaedic Consultants

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Welcome

Advanced Interventional Spine & Orthopaedic Consultants objectively treats and evaluates both acute and chronic spine injuries, including symptoms resulting from longterm dieases and conditions, as well as short-term such as auto accident injuries in Largo, Pinellas Park, Bradenton, and Lakeland. We use the latest treatment options to achieve maximum medical improvements, including treatments such as stem cell therapy.

Shingles

Shingles is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. Although it can occur anywhere on your body, it most often appears as a single stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or the right side of your torso.

It is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you’ve had chickenpox, the virus lies inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles.

While it isn’t a life-threatening condition, shingles can be very painful. Vaccines can help reduce the risk of shingles, while early treatment can help shorten a shingles infection and lessen the chance of complications.

Causes

Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. Anyone who’s had chickenpox may develop shingles. After you recover from chickenpox, the virus can enter your nervous system and lie dormant for years. Eventually, it may reactivate and travel along nerve pathways to your skin — producing shingles.

The reason for the encore is unclear. But it may be due to lowered immunity to infections as you grow older. Shingles is more common in older adults and in people who have weak immune systems.

Varicella-zoster is part of a group of viruses called herpes viruses, which includes the viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes. Because of this, shingles is also known as herpes zoster. But the virus that causes chickenpox and shingles is not the same virus responsible for cold sores or genital herpes, a sexually transmitted infection.

Are you contagious?

A person with shingles can pass the varicella-zoster virus to anyone who isn’t immune to chickenpox. This usually occurs through direct contact with the open sores of the shingles rash. Once infected, the person will develop chickenpox, however, not shingles.

Chickenpox can be dangerous for some groups of people. Until your shingles blisters scab over, you are contagious and should avoid physical contact with:

  • Anyone who has a weak immune system
  • Newborns
  • Pregnant women

Risk Factors

Anyone who has ever had chickenpox can develop shingles. Most adults in the United States had chickenpox when they were children, before the advent of the routine childhood vaccination that now protects against chickenpox.

Factors that may increase your risk of developing shingles include:

Age. Shingles is most common in people older than 50. The risk increases with age. Some experts estimate that half the people who live to the age of 85 will experience shingles at some point in their lives.

Diseases. Diseases that weaken your immune system, such as HIV/AIDS and cancer, can increase your risk of shingles.

Cancer treatments. Undergoing radiation or chemotherapy can lower your resistance to diseases and may trigger shingles.

Medications. Drugs designed to prevent rejection of transplanted organs can increase your risk of shingles — as can prolonged use of steroids, such as prednisone.

Dr. Chowdhury is the leading objective auto injury doctor and personal injury doctor in Largo and the surrounding area (including Pinellas Park, Bradenton, and Lakeland) and is very experienced in the diagnosis and treatment of all auto-related injuries. For more information about our other services, such as stem cell therapy Largo, stem cell therapy Tampa, stem cell therapy Bradenton, stem cell therapy Pinellas Park, and stem cell therapy Lakeland, please contact Dr. Chowdhury directly at our objective accident clinic in Largo, which is open for patients Monday – Friday: 8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.

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